SBR Coaching Announces Training for the Breath of Life Ventura Triathlon

SBR Coaching's training will take place May 14 – June 26, 2016. Training days will be on Wednesdays from 6-7:30 p.m. and Saturdays from 8-10:30 a.m. SBR Coaching will utilize Racquet Club of Irvine's pool and open water swims at local OC beaches, as well as running and cycling trails in Newport Beach, Irvine, Tustin and Laguna Niguel.

SBR Coaching, a fitness training company that specializes in preparation for triathlons, has announced a six-week program designed to prepare beginner to intermediate triathletes, of all ages, for the upcoming Breath of Life Ventura Triathlon.

The Breath of Life Ventura Triathlon is hosted by Renegade Racing, the premiere event company in Southern California. The 18th Annual Breath of Life Ventura Triathlon, to take place Sunday, June 26 at the Ventura Harbor, encourages athletes to perform their own fundraising in support of treatment facilities at local hospitals supporting children diagnosed with Primary Immunodeficiency (PI).

Coach Pam Nichol, owner of SBR Coaching, says training will include four open water swim sessions, track workouts, race prep, race strategy and also a practice race. She also added that her "clients love Renegade Racing events because they are the safest, most well-organized and enjoyable events."

E.M. Nathanson, ‘The Dirty Dozen’ Author, Dies at 87

Laguna Niguel, CA – The 1967 action-packed war movie based on the novel featured an all-star cast including Lee Marvin, Ernest Borgnine and Telly Savalas.

Nathanson died Tuesday of heart failure in Laguna Niguel, Calif., his longtime friend Frank McAdams told The Hollywood Reporter.E.M. Nathanson, who wrote the 1965 war novel The Dirty Dozen that was adapted for the action-packed film starring Lee Marvin and Ernest Borgnine, has died. He was 87.

Nathanson died Tuesday of heart failure in Laguna Niguel, Calif., his longtime friend Frank McAdams told The Hollywood Reporter.

Nathanson is best known for The Dirty Dozen, the story of 12 convicted servicemen — robbers, murderers, rapists — who are sent off on a suicide mission to blow up a chateau of German generals just before D-Day with the promise that those who survive will have their sentences commuted.

The novel was inspired by the supposedly true story of some World War II criminal soldiers who got the nickname the Dirty Dozen (or Filthy Thirteen, depending on the source) for their refusal to bathe and who were said to have been sent off on a similar mission. Nathanson heard the story from his friend, producer Russ Meyer (Beyond the Valley of the Dolls), who said he learned of the yarn while working as a combat photographer during World War II.

Nathanson got a book contract to tell the story, but even after doing more than two years of research, he was never able to verify the accuracy of Meyer’s tale. So he and his editor decided to fictionalize the story.

The best-selling novel sold more than 2 million copies, was translated into 10 languages and was made into the 1967 film of the same name that was directed by Robert Aldrich and also starred Charles Bronson, newly retired NFL star Jim Brown, John Cassavetes, George Kennedy and Donald Sutherland.

The movie was nominated for four Oscars and ranked No. 65 on the American Film Institute’s list of the 100 great suspense/thriller movies in American film. 

Nathanson wrote a sequel, A Dirty Distant War, in 1987. It picks up the story of John Reisman, the OSS officer who recruited the Dirty Dozen, three months after the first novel. Here he parachutes into French Indochina (Vietnam) to help local guerrillas against the Japanese.

Nathanson wrote four other novels: 1970's The Latecomers, 1973's It Gave Everybody Something to Do (with Louise Thoresen), 1993's Knight's Cross (with Aaron Bank) and 2003's Lovers and Schemers.

Nathanson was born in 1928 and grew up in Yonkers, N.Y. His parents separated when he was 2, and because his mother suffered from depression, she sent him when he was 7 to the Hebrew National Home, a local orphanage. He stayed at Hebrew National until he graduated high school and remained in touch with the people he befriended there for the rest of his life.

Nathanson majored in anthropology at New York University. His first job as a journalist was for Women’s Wear Daily when he was 17. He also worked for the Washington PostTheArlington SunDaring Detective magazine and as a freelance journalist.

He is survived by his partner Elizabeth Henderson and a son Michael from his marriage to Mary Ann Nathanson.   

Lindora to open clinic in Laguna Niguel

Laguna Niguel, CA – Weight-loss clinic Lindora will open a new location Friday in Laguna Niguel.

Lindora offers personalized weight-loss programs after customers undergo a consultation, physical exam, lab panel and fitness assessment. Patients then come to the clinic two to five times a week and meet with a nurse each time to weigh in and review their weight-loss plan.

The clinic has five staff members including three nurses.

Some insurance carriers cover or contribute to Lindora’s Lean for Life medical weight loss program.

The clinic is located at 31271 Niguel Road, Suite B. Lindora has 41 other locations in Southern California.

Veggie Mama Update – How They’re Doing After Shark Tank

Laguna Niguel, CA - Theresa and Robert Frejo of Laguna Niguel, California, are a mom-and-dad couple who are responsible for founding and owning Veggie Mama. Getting their children to eat healthy has always been a battle, so in order to properly feed their children all the necessary vitamins, they got creative about the recipes they would need to make. Theresa and Robert are both heavily invested in Veggie Mama, having invested every dime of their savings and even going so far as to sell the diamond from Theresa’s wedding band to fund Veggie Mama.

Theresa enters the Shark Tank and introduces herself, saying that she is the Veggie Mama and Robert is the Veggie Papa. They are seeking $75,000 in exchange for a 15% equity. Theresa continues to say that every parent knows it is not easy to get children or husbands to eat their vegetables, but with Veggie Mama, it isVeggie Mama makes healthy, delicious tasting products for children that incorporate foods for picky eaters, like spinacheasy to sneak in those essential nutrients. Picky kids typically want something tasty, which spinach and beets are not – so Veggie Mama has created Garden Pops, which are snacks made with real fruits and vegetables and sweetened only with organic agave nectar – no artificial colors or flavors or preservatives are found in Veggie Mama. Theresa then offers the Sharks a sample, mentioning the flavors she has prepared including a Cucumber Citrus Flavor which she says their children love, and is far healthier than spinach alone. The flavors included in Garden Pops are Carrot Berry, Citrus Cucumber, and Sweet Potato Pie. The sharks are all surprised by the flavor of the pops, as Theresa continues on to says that it is gluten and dairy free, as well as friendly with vegans.

Kevin says that he is surprised by the taste, and he had thought it was just going to taste like crap. The sharks continue to question the details about Veggie Mama. Each package costs around $1.10 to make for 6 pops, and wholesale is at $2.25. Sales are around $30,000 currently, with most of those sales having come through within the last 6 weeks prior to filming the Shark Tank episode. After starting in Whole Foods, they moved on to also include Sprouts Farmer’s Markets. Robert questions the details, wanting to know more about the journey of Veggie Mama. Theresa says that she has been mostly the Mama in Veggie Mama, while Robert dropped out of law school. Mark notes that despite Robert dropping out of law school, there is actually one less lawyer involved in the process, which could save the two some money.1

Robert questions the method of production; how it is made, what is the capacity, and how much room they could add. Theresa says that they have much more room for additional capacity, and that they rented a facility out of Southern California. Mark asks how much money has been invested by the couple in the Veggie Mama business, which Theresa says the total investment has been a total of $140,000 – $30,000 of their own, and $110,000 from an investor friend. At the facility, Robert and Theresa are running the machinery. Theresa works full time, while Robert works part time and has a separate job full time making $67,000 – Kevin says that for the same amount of money, he can buy Robert as a full time employee for the business.

Mark steps in and says that he has had experience with frozen food business, and that to take it nationwide would be a huge effort and cost, and he does not want to scramble for it – he is out immediately. Barbara says that she believes it would be in the best bet of the two to find a partner, and that every partner she has had in a similar business has had the opposite of Veggie Mama’s numbers. $110,000 in sales through $30,000 of investment. Barbara is out as well.

Kevin says that he would invest the $75,000, wanting to make $.50 off every unit, which would then drop to $.25 once he recovers his entire investment. Kevin says that he has had success with this structure in food, namely in cupcakes, and that he has had a monster success in working with this structure. Robert says that there is no other business like this in the United States, and they must go with it; however, his problem is that $75,000 does not seem like enough money to go out and make a proper business of it. Robert offers $75,000 for 25%, and within the next 6 to 12 months, intends to make an additional offer of $75,000 to let Robert come back into the business full time so that it doesn’t even have to come out of the business – this brings the $150,000 investment to a 25% stake.

Lori says that she loved the product, and would also like to make an offer of $75,000 of 20%, and says that if there is the need for more money as the metaphorical ball gets rolling, she can provide it to Veggie Mama. Lori also has connections to numerous stores, and can work on exclusive deals with distribution. Kevin rebuttals, saying that he thinks getting Robert back to working full time is crucial to the success of Veggie Mama; he offers $150,000 at the stipulation of Robert quitting his job upon receipt of the cash, and continuing to give Kevin $.50 of each unit sold until he recoups his $150,000 investment, where it then drops again to $.25 per unit. This essentially sets Kevin as the bank, since he says that he does not believe he needs equity.

Lori says that whenever Kevin would like to spice things up in the Shark Tank, she would as well. She says that she has invited Robert also in on the deal with her. Robert says he would offer $75,000 for 20%, and would offer another $75,000 when Robert is ready to return to the business full time, but along the way, they would want a $.20 royalty since Veggie Mama would be receiving two of the Sharks.

Mark steps in and says that he feels Robert and Theresa have made a big mistake; when you are supposed to walk into the Shark Tank, you look for the sucker. He feels that the new deal Robert made is not as good as his old deal, and since they didn’t take the sucker up on his deal, that the two are actually the suckers – they could have received a lot more money for a lot less, and were unable to get the best out of their negotiation.

Ultimately, Robert and Theresa Frejo of Veggie Mama settled upon a deal with Mark and Barbara for $75,000 for a 20% equity with no royalty. The Sharks almost entered a sort of bidding war, working together with each other to collude out other Sharks.

Where is Veggie Mama Now in 2016 – After Shark Tank Update?

Since appearing on Shark Tank, Veggie Mama has expanded its product line to also include garden jams. Veggie Mama has also begun to move products across the nation, and even has a map of where you can find Veggie Mama products in your local vicinity with a nice map that shows exactly which store carries what type of products. In addition, Veggie Mama also has started an online store where customers can purchase Veggie Mama products for either home use, or commercial-sized for retail and wholesale.

Jury Sides with Monsanto in Laguna Niguel Lymphoma Patient’s PCBs Suit

Laguna Niguel, CA – The Los Angeles Superior Court jury was in its fifth day of deliberations when it voted to reject the negligence/design defect lawsuit brought by 87-year-old retired software developer John Di Costanzo and Marina del Rey filmmaker Roslyn Dauber, 62, City News Service reports.

They claimed Monsanto knew about the dangers of PCBs in the 1930s yet falsely told the public the compound was safe through 1977, when sales halted. Rivers, streams and food humans consume still contain levels of PCBs.

Scott Frieling, the attorney who represented Di Costanzo and Dauber, told jurors Monsanto pumped up sales despite knowing of the toxic consequences and that the corporation failed to conduct testing to determine the long-term effects of exposure.

But Monsanto attorney Anthony Upshaw countered the corporation performed several safety studies concerning the manufacturing of PCBs and that the compound had many positive benefits. These include increasing industrial safety and, when used as insulation, preventing electrical transformers from exploding.

As for Di Costanzo and Dauber, Upshaw contended they had average levels of PCBs in their systems, that the woman's disease is in remission, and that several other toxins, viruses and exposures could be behind the pair's lymphoma. Laguna Niguel, CA – The Los Angeles Superior Court jury was in its fifth day of deliberations when it voted to reject the negligence/design defect lawsuit brought by 87-year-old retired software developer John Di Costanzo and Marina del Rey filmmaker Roslyn Dauber, 62, City News Service reports.

They claimed Monsanto knew about the dangers of PCBs in the 1930s yet falsely told the public the compound was safe through 1977, when sales halted. Rivers, streams and food humans consume still contain levels of PCBs.

Scott Frieling, the attorney who represented Di Costanzo and Dauber, told jurors Monsanto pumped up sales despite knowing of the toxic consequences and that the corporation failed to conduct testing to determine the long-term effects of exposure.

But Monsanto attorney Anthony Upshaw countered the corporation performed several safety studies concerning the manufacturing of PCBs and that the compound had many positive benefits. These include increasing industrial safety and, when used as insulation, preventing electrical transformers from exploding.

As for Di Costanzo and Dauber, Upshaw contended they had average levels of PCBs in their systems, that the woman's disease is in remission, and that several other toxins, viruses and exposures could be behind the pair's lymphoma. 

Artwork brightens 5 street corners in San Clemente

Five San Clemente street corners have a fresh splash of color, thanks to the city’s 2013 public-art program.

On Sunday, artists selected by a jury from the city and the San Clemente Art Association put finishing touches on traffic-signal controller boxes. The public artworks are in addition to five boxes dressed up a year ago in the city’s inaugural effort to brighten up the otherwise drab utilities.

We asked this year’s artists (by location of the boxes) about what inspired their artwork:

• Camino de los Mares (entrance to San Clemente Villas): “In Flight,” by Regina Hurley. “I watch the birds a lot. And then we went on a whale-watching trip and saw a lot of dolphins and we did see a whale. I began sketching with the birds … then went into the idea of them transitioning from dolphins into birds. They are abstract forms, so it leads to the imagination, as well as the spirit of it.”

• Calle del Cerro (lower intersection with Avenida Vista Montana): “Sunset at Trestles,” by Ashley Keene. “I’ve lived around here my whole life and I go down to walks at the pier and the beach. I just love painting at the beach. It just seemed like the perfect sketch to do … it’s just that peacefulness. It’s Trestles, or the Cotton’s Point area.”

• Avenida Pico (at Calle del Cerro): “Sunset Dinner,” by Mike Ravetti. “The city wanted to have something that is unique about San Clemente. When I thought about the sunset and the pier and bright color and just kind of that relaxed feel, the pelican that I thought would be a great idea with the sunset and the pier in the background.

• Avenida Palizada (at Avenida de la Estrella): “SC Classic View,” by Meghann Nelsen. “The Classic Car Show is one of my favorite events in San Clemente. The pier and the sunset is another classic scene from San Clemente. So I just combined some of my favorite scenes.”

• El Camino Real (at Avenida Mariposa): “Buried in Nature,” by Josh Barnes. “I’ve just grown up in San Clemente. Growing up as a kid, I remember seeing VW bugs with the surfboards on top and I just loved it.”

NEXT YEAR?

It will be up to the City Council to decide whether to fund another round of the street-art program next year. This year’s was budgeted at $5,500.

“I sure hope we do more next year,” Councilwoman Lori Donchak said. “It’s gotten a really great reaction. I cannot see why we would not do another round.”

Donchak was out interviewing the artists Sunday for an episode of “Around Town,” the city’s TV show. It could begin showing in three to four weeks on Cox cable Channel 3 and the city’s website

Train Service Stopped, Pedestrian Beach Access Limited This Weekend

Train Service Stopped, Pedestrian Beach Access Limited This Weekend
Find out where walking to the beach may be difficult.

Getting across the tracks to the beaches in San Clemente may be harder this weekend. Patch file photo.
Getting across the tracks to the beaches in San Clemente may be harder this weekend. Patch file photo.
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Train service is cancelled this weekend in San Clemente and beach trail access will be limited so that workers can continue to make safety enhancements at the pedestrian railroad crossings along the Coastal Trail.

To meet state and federal safety standards and ensure residents and visitors are safe while crossing the railroad tracks , the city is teaming up with the Orange County Transportation Authority to improve the crossings to include wider paved areas, new fencing, additional crossing gate arms, improved signs and installation of electrical conduit, according to a city press release.

Again this weekend, because of the construction, there will be limited trail access and no train service in San Clemente.

Specific locations for construction work this Saturday are as follows:

El Portal – civil work (concrete, etc.) – crossing will be closed as needed
T Street – civil work (concrete, etc.) – crossing will be closed as needed
Corto – full track work – crossing will be closed 1 a.m. Saturday morning to 7 a.m. Sunday morning. The Linda Lane tunnel will be used as a detour and there will be detour signs for both directions along the trail.
Calafia – full track work – crossing will be closed 1 a.m. Saturday morning to 7 a.m. Sunday morning. The Montalvo undercrossing will be used as a detour and there will be detour signs for both directions along the trail.
Work will occur during the daytime and at night during the week at various locations over varying time frames from now until Dec. 31, 2013 with no full closures of the crossings unless coordinated prior to start dates, according to the release.